Why So Many Versions of 1Password?

As far as I can tell, there are three ways I can use 1Password with my Chrome web browser:

1- from the desktop application (by clicking on the icon in the notification area);
2a- from the browser extension (by clicking on the icon is the browser toolbar); and
2b - from the browser extension (by right-clicking on the icon in in the browser toolbar and choosing '1Password X - Password Manager')

What is the practical difference between these three methods. In particular, why have both a desktop version and a web browser version?

A related question: What is 1Password X? To my addled brain, that sounds like version 10, but a quick trip to Help from the desktop icon shows that I have version 7.


1Password Version: 7.3.684
Extension Version: q.15.1
OS Version: Windows 10
Sync Type: ?

Comments

  • brentybrenty

    Team Member
    edited May 13

    @BulldogX: Sorry for the confusion, but it's pretty straightforward if we take a step back:

    • If you're using the 1Password desktop extension in your browser, that is the desktop app -- in this case 1Password for Windows -- so that's one thing, just with multiple parts (in order to integrate with the browser. Whether you open the main window, click the notification tray icon, click the browser toolbar button, or use the keyboard to bring 1Password up, that's all literally the same app: 1Password for Windows. The current versions of the app and extension are 7.3.684 and 4.7.3 respectively.
    • If you're using 1Password X, that's it: it's completely self-contained, it's designed so that people who can't install the desktop app can still use 1Password in their browser. Therefore it uses a completely separate version scheme. "1Password X" is the name; the current version is 1.15.1.

    You only need one of those setup. Does that help? :)

  • No, that doesn't help a bit. I don't understand why I need to install an application in Windows 10 when everything I need to operate 1Password is in the Chrome browser extension. The only thing the application has that the extension doesn't have is the 1Password settings, but those could also be included in the web browser extension. (There are also three separate sets of settings: 1) 'Show 1Password' in the installed application; 2) the 'gear' accessible by clicking on the 1Password icon in Chrome's toolbar; and 3) the separate Settings accessible by right-clicking on the 1Password icon in Chrome's toolbar.)

  • brentybrenty

    Team Member

    I don't understand why I need to install an application in Windows 10 when everything I need to operate 1Password is in the Chrome browser extension.

    @BulldogX: You don't. If 1Password X does everything you need, you're all set. :) But just as some people need/want to use 1Password solely in the browser, many prefer the desktop app/extension since that is usable independent of the browser. But again, if 1Password X has everything you need, you don't need to worry about the rest at all. Cheers! :)

  • Alright, I think I've finally worked out the difference between the application that is installed on the computer and the web browser extension, whatever their names are. There appear to be (at least) two differences:

    Signing in to websites

    When using the web browser extension, you navigate to a website's sign-in page on your own. When using the installed application, you can click on the website's entry in Logins (Alt+3) and 1Password will bring you to the sign-in page.

    When using the web browser extension, you can sign in to websites by clicking on the 1Password icon in the username or password fields of the website's sign-in page.

    When using the installed application there is no 1Password icon in the username or password fields of a website's sign-in page. Instead, you need to click in the username and password fields, successively, then right-click on the website's entry in Logins (Alt+3) and either copy and paste your username and password or simply click on the name of the sign-in window. In the latter case 1Password will automatically fill in the username and password.

    When does 1Password lock?

    When using the web browser extension, 1Password locks when the browser is closed or after a user-specified length of inactivity (up to 300 minutes.)

    When using the installed application, 1Password locks after the computer is idle for a user-specified length of time that includes 'Never,' which means that 1Password never locks until the computer is restarted.

    Need to be careful

    When using the installed application, and right-clicking on a website's entry in Logins (Alt+3,) 1Password will show the website's sign-in page and all other open windows. You need to be careful to click on the name of the website's sign-in page, because if you make a mistake and click on the name of an open window, your username or password will be inserted into that open window.

  • bundtkatebundtkate

    Team Member

    @BulldogX: There are only differences here specifically because you're using 1Password X in your browser which, as brenty mentioned, doesn't require the desktop app at all. At this point, you're worrying about differences you really shouldn't need to. You said yourself that you can do everything in your browser and that's absolutely true with 1Password X. Were I in your position, I'd go ahead and uninstall the desktop app. Some folks find it handy alongside 1Password X, but it sounds like you're finding it more confusing than anything else. 1Password X can essentially do anything the desktop app can. For example, you mentioned

    When using the web browser extension, you navigate to a website's sign-in page on your own.

    But that's actually not the case. 1Password X will open the sign-in page for you too. Just click the 1Password icon in your toolbar, search for a Login item you want to use to sign in, then click it. 1Password X will open the site and fill for you. It sounds very much like you'd be happier with 1Password X by itself and as such I'd definitely suggest ditching the desktop app and giving the extension a try on its own. :chuffed:

  • BulldogXBulldogX
    edited May 13

    Were I in your position, I'd go ahead and uninstall the desktop app. Some folks find it handy alongside 1Password X, but it sounds like you're finding it more confusing than anything else.

    Yep - that's for sure. The desktop application is uninstalled. Its only advantage to me was that I didn't have to type my master password every time I wanted to use it.

  • bundtkatebundtkate

    Team Member

    Don't forget, @BulldogX, you can disable autolock for 1Password X – click the gear icon, select settings, then toggle "Automatically lock 1Password" off right at the top. It will still lock when you close your browser, but otherwise should remain unlocked so long as your browser is open. :+1:

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