Feature request: VPN

I'm not sure if I should name the "other" password management software that offers VPN in their product or not. Is this a possibility for 1Password to implement this feature as well? Now that people are using "opened" wifi network more and more, it would be a nice feature for 1Password to add this service. I'm a family plan subscriber, I have been using 1Password for years. Keep up the great work!


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Comments

  • BenBen AWS Team

    Team Member

    Hi @prayman,

    While a VPN service can indeed be very valuable, and we would recommend using one especially on an untrusted network, I don’t believe we have any plans to enter this space. Our focus is on our core offering: password management.

    Thanks for the note!

    Ben

  • primeprime
    edited July 26

    The VPN feature is not a selling point. I would love to know if they are a non-logging VPN service. There are so many VPN services out there, enough to make your head spin. Also, evenwotj a VPN service, I won’t go on certain sites on a network that I do not control.

    The one selling point I did like was the credit monitoring they offer (credit monitoring, identity restoration support, and Identity Theft Insurance coverage) .Right now I have ID Shield that does this.

    Pretty cool, but I’m not leaving 1Password. I like that it’s just not my master password keeping my data safe.

  • jpgoldbergjpgoldberg Agile Customer Care

    Team Member

    Hi @prayman! I know that a lot of people have been saying "use a VPN to remain secure", but often they say that in response to a problem that a VPN wouldn't solve. It's become a bit of a fad. They are valuable in some circumstances, and I do recommend using them, but they are over-rated.

    VPNs are only1 needed if you are not using TLS (properly). So if you only visit HTTPS sites and avoid HTTP sites (and if you don't dismiss browser warnings) then your connections are safe over untrusted networks. The whole point of TLS (the stuff that puts the "S" in "HTTPS") is so that you can communicate securely over an untrusted network.

    VPNs (in the way mentioned here), are intended to tunnel under untrusted networks to use trusted ones. Back in the days only "high security" services used TLS, VPNs were important, but that need is fading. TLS (done properly) is the better solution.

    Our own internal security guidelines for our people recommend a VPN when using an untrusted network, but don't require it if it is burdensome. What is required is pay attention to browser warnings and keeping systems (and browsers) up to date.


    1. There are a couple of other uses of VPNs, but those aren't what is being asked about here. ↩︎

  • edited August 1

    I hope 1Password remains focused on just password management. I have the password manager that the OP mentions and they just upped their yearly price from $40 to $60 for redundant services such as a VPN. Their added "dark web" monitoring sounds cool and looks like it is provided by a company called Spycloud. Seems like it could be more robust than Watchtower (matches breached SSN and bank account #s to breached emails, etc.), but I'm not sure it's worth the extra price (or how it really works). My anti-virus provider already offers the same VPN service (Hotspot Shield technology -- people have had privacy concerns about this provider, but if they are only using their tech maybe it doesn't matter?) and dark web monitoring. I feel like I'm paying for this stuff too many times and I'd prefer not to count on one single company for all of my security/privacy.

    So to make a long story short I'm testing out three password managers currently (full yearly subscriptions for all) and I love that 1Password is priced somewhere in the middle, focuses just on password management, uses more than my master password to secure my passwords (like prime mentions above), and has an active forum where the developers actively participate (and elsewhere on the web too). Definitely sticking to 1Password when it comes time to renew.

  • BenBen AWS Team

    Team Member

    Thanks for the feedback and the kind words, @muckle_dabuckle. Focusing on password management is indeed the plan. :)

    Ben

  • if all you need to do is change the region to unblock stuff that's region-locked or geo-restricted, anything from a vpn might work for you. if however, you connect to public Wi-Fis more often and/or want to secure your transactions and all, get a vpn that has encryption and preferably a kill switch so even if that thing drops the connection half way, you won't be engaging in insecure transactions.

  • brentybrenty

    Team Member

    I don't disagree. :)

  • Just a suggestion. I know (many) people here use Encrypt.me and eero Plus has 1Password, Encrypt.me and Malwarebytes as a bundle so eero may be a place to start?

  • brentybrenty

    Team Member

    I got it for my parents and they've been really happy with it. :)

  • wkleemwkleem
    edited August 14

    Eero has been bundling router protection that doesn’t involve subscriptions and not simply a basic protection for free. It might be worthwhile to look into it.

  • primeprime
    edited August 14

    my issue with eero is, the routers must connect to their servers to work. They go down, your internet goes down. I am also concerned about privacy too with this set up.

    When I was looking for a mesh system, I read this on a few reviews and it didn’t sit right with me.

  • BenBen AWS Team

    Team Member

    Hmm. That's interesting. I'd think the basic functions would continue even in the event of an outage on their end... Have you experienced that first hand, or confirmed with eero that is the case? I've used other cloud based networking devices before (Meraki, which I believe is now owned by Cisco), and that is how they worked. You generally couldn't update their config or use some features like Captive Portal without internet (or if Meraki was offline), but they'd still function.

    Ben

  • @Ben
    Here is one of the reviews:

    Keep in mind that the Eero connects to the company's cloud-based server at all times. Privacy advocates, take note: Eero says is only takes in diagnostic data to better maximize the mesh network, not user activities such as websites they visit, movies they stream and so on.

    https://www.cnet.com/reviews/eero-wi-fi-system-review/

    I was at a friends house watching movies and internet went out. We figured we would just stream from his iMac to his Apple TV (I’ve done this before at my old place, internet constantly going out) and it would not work. We hooked up his old router, and worked like a charm.

    He returned it and got an Ubiquiti AmpliFi HD set up. Fun we tested it without and internet connect, and no issues.

  • BenBen AWS Team

    Team Member

    Strange, though I’d still be interested to see eero’s official position on this. That said I’m personally a big fan of Ubiquiti. I haven’t used their AmpliFi line but I use their EdgeOS products and UniFi APs. :+1:

    Ben

  • brentybrenty

    Team Member

    @prime: Hmm. Not 100% sure about that. If eero has had outages they've been overshadowed by the cable company and my parents haven't noticed. Anyway, the local network still seems to work fine in those situations; just can't access the internet (thanks, [cable company]!) :lol:

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