Folder-based syncing on Windows

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Comments

  • edited December 2014

    Dropbox is your friend.

    Not if, as several people have expressed on here, you wish to keep your data off of public networks.

    This is why we also have Wi-Fi Sync.

    Which is not available between Mac and Windows, and thus brings us back to the initial question of network syncing...

    From the discussion I have learned that:

    • Windows does not have an internal database
    • Instead, it works directly on the filesystem
    • For this reason there is not folder sync on Windows

    In other words, if you want local network syncing on Windows, it is up to the user how to do this.
    For desktops an straightforward solution could be to access a shared network folder as chances of conflicting updates are minimal.
    For laptops, it's basically up to the user to figure out how to setup the sync.

    In the past I have used an application called GoodSync for synchronizing files between two folders. One of the unfortunate side-effects of this app was that it created hidden files and folders in the synchronizing folders. Would this have any negative impact on the 1Password keychain?

  • edited December 2014

    In the past I have used an application called GoodSync for synchronizing files between two folders. One of the unfortunate side-effects of this app was that it created hidden files and folders in the synchronizing folders. Would this have any negative impact on the 1Password keychain?

    @TwinTraveller‌ I'm guessing "no".

  • DBrownDBrown 1Password Alumni

    Just for the record, supported sync options are described in this user's guide article.

  • I suggest to try KrojamSoft SyncFile program

  • brentybrenty

    Team Member
    edited March 2015

    In addition to everything else said here (great discussion!), I just wanted to add that any important data cries out "backup!" -- even if you can't hear it. I'd be hesitant to store my 1Password data on a network drive because bad things can -- and do -- happen if it goes offline during a write.

    I understand and appreciate the cloud storage concerns, but I personally use Dropbox because it works hard to prevent data loss in case of a broken network connection...and then takes sure everything is sync'd properly once it is reestablished. And with 1Password, my data is encrypted anyway. But Windows and OS X just cross their fingers and try to write to the filesystem. It doesn't do me much good to have my data 'secure' if it's corrupted or just-plain-gone. ;)

  • AlexHoffmannAlexHoffmann

    Team Member

    Brenty made two important points:

    1. Keep backups. Lots of them. No really, backups.
    2. Dropbox takes most of the hassle out of making sure that everything syncs correctly across file systems.

    A third point to make is that Dropbox will also make sure there aren't any permissions issues between the two PCs and the network share, which can in some cases prevent you from writing the file.
    We've had reports of users having success with apps like local network bittorrent sync and GoodSync. It's certainly worth a try.

  • edited March 2015

    I understand that AgileBits may be reluctant to go as far as implementing their own network sync on Windows (and based on this thread, that reluctance is pretty firm :). It may seem like inventing another wheel, but you've got to admit the use case is very real, and it needs a good solution.

    There are many organizations that have restrictions on what can and cannot be stored in the cloud, regardless of how well the data is encrypted. Those of us who worked in financial and some other sectors know that these restrictions can be very rigid. Organizations like that prefer to own and control their user's data storage, and the cloud is not always an option. So imagine a mobile user who needs to share his vault between his laptop and a corporate (home, school, whatever) desktop/tablet/etc. He can't use a network share to store the vault on his laptop, because the share is not always available. But he'd need to SYNC with it, not BACKUP into it. And there's really no way to do it with 1Password on Windows.

    On a Mac, it's a no-brainer as 1Password has folder sync. In the same time, Windows users are forced to seek third party solutions for folder sync, and that puts them at a sizable disadvantage.

  • brentybrenty

    Team Member
    edited March 2015

    @dplatonoff: Agreed! Rather, I think we can all agree that there isn't a one-size-fits-all sync solution that can meet everyone's needs, and there are plenty of use cases (even apart from your excellent example) where another option would be both welcome and needed -- especially when platform differences 'get in the way'.

    But as you intimated, it isn't something that could be taken on lightly. There would be a lot of work involved (some of which would be duplicating functionality that already exists in another form), and such an undertaking would likely require resources to either be freed up (no fixes or features left to do! yay!) or diverted (low priority stuff that can sit on the backburner). And I think it's safe to say that something like this wouldn't be worth doing at all if it isn't done well!

    I'm not holding my breath, but know that your feedback is appreciated and noted. Perhaps one day you'll get your wish! Only time will tell. :chuffed:

  • edited March 2015

    imagine a mobile user who needs to share his vault between his laptop and a corporate (home, school, whatever) desktop/tablet/etc. He can't use a network share to store the vault on his laptop, because the share is not always available.

    @dplatonoff @brenty

    1. Install 1Password on your mobile (Android or iOS) device, and then use Wi-Fi Sync on your laptop, or
    2. Use 1PasswordAnywhere on your corporate desktop.
  • edited March 2015

    @svondutch

    Install 1Password on your mobile (Android or iOS) device, and then use Wi-Fi Sync on your laptop, or

    Which will likely breach corporate data usage policy unless you have a company phone. Even if you do, you may not be able to install 1Password on it.

    Use 1PasswordAnywhere on your corporate desktop

    Which still requires the use of third party software (a web server).

  • Install 1Password on your mobile (Android or iOS) device, and then use Wi-Fi Sync on your laptop

    The Android version does not support Wi-Fi Sync, am I missing something?

    Use 1PasswordAnywhere on your corporate desktop.

    Reading the doc on 1PasswordAnywhere: "To use 1PasswordAnywhere: 1. Sign in to your Dropbox account on the web."
    Nope, that wouldn't work if cloud services are not allowed. Which is the point of this thread.

    I understand you strongly favor Dropbox, as it's the only solution that ties together all of your supported platforms. Other than that, there's obviously iCloud and WiFi sync for Mac/iOS devices. OneDrive works well for Windows too, and would be my preferred solution there.

  • The Android version does not support Wi-Fi Sync, am I missing something?

    No, you're not.

    Reading the doc on 1PasswordAnywhere: "To use 1PasswordAnywhere: 1. Sign in to your Dropbox account on the web."

    Nope, that wouldn't work if cloud services are not allowed. Which is the point of this thread.

    1PasswordAnywhere can be used locally using a local webserver:
    https://discussions.agilebits.com/discussion/comment/186073#Comment_186073

  • 1PasswordAnywhere can be used locally using a local webserver

    Thanks for the tip. I didn't realize my vault comes with a generated html page and all the keys in JSON. This is clever, even though it's just a key viewer.

  • Trying my luck with Offline files on Windows. Set up a dedicated protected share on the file server, marked it as "available offline" on Windows and configured 1Password to use it as a vault location. So far so good. Turned networking off, 1Password is still operational.

    Could that be a win for Windows? Between that, and something like FolderSync on Android pointing at the same share, most scenarios should be covered.

  • brentybrenty

    Team Member

    @dplatonoff: If that works for you, that's great! Obviously it isn't something AgileBits can support officially. Essentially, anything that will sync and store the data reliably should work, since 1Password for Windows just writes to the local filesystem. :)

    1PasswordAnywhere was more useful back when the major browsers didn't restrict local file access, but it can still be handy in a pinch, depending on your situation. ;)

  • If that works for you, that's great! Obviously it isn't something AgileBits can support officially.

    Why not though? You have a guide for OneDrive, and Offline Files is exactly the same mechanism with the only difference that the contents is synced with a network share instead of the cloud. It's been in Windows since forever, and it got much more reliable over the years, now that Microsoft trusts it enough to adapt it for cloud storage as well. It seems to be cut out exactly for applications like this: small file sizes, mostly reads, atomic updates by a single user at a time. In fact, it's such an obvious solution, I'm now mad at myself for not thinking of it sooner.

  • MikeTMikeT Agile Samurai

    Team Member
    edited March 2015

    Hi @dplatonoff,

    Why not though? You have a guide for OneDrive, and Offline Files is exactly the same mechanism with the only difference that the contents is synced with a network share instead of the cloud.

    Mainly because this is untested by us and we don't know what the side effects could be, we cannot officially support anything we haven't tested first. We must always be cautious with anything that could affect your data.

This discussion has been closed.